Portia

Written and directed by Robert Gillespie “It takes talent and technique to engage an audience and to hold their attention for an hour whilst truthfully telling a story. Cameron does so with the illusion of naturalism, but in the role of Isabel she reveals a great flair for comic timing, relishing a good number of […]


Portia

Credit: Claire Stringer

Written and directed by Robert Gillespie

“It takes talent and technique to engage an audience and to hold their attention for an hour whilst truthfully telling a story. Cameron does so with the illusion of naturalism, but in the role of Isabel she reveals a great flair for comic timing, relishing a good number of sardonic asides…. Portia is a brilliantly crafted monologue full of interesting ideas, and the show proved a terrific combination of two born story-tellers in symbiosis, making for a diverting, thought-provoking and funny hour of theatre… it’s a warm story of what makes us who we are, and the limitations imposed upon us by society, that will touch everyone in different ways” – Entertainment Focus

A philosophical comedy, Portia compares the expectations of Venetian society with those of contemporary British society and takes a new look at an old story.

Preparing to go on stage to play the role of Portia, Isabel reflects on the choices she’s made as a jobbing actress, the choices she’s made as a woman and where the edges of the actor and character meet.

Has the way women select their partners changed that much since Portia and her trio of caskets? Do women still have to exhibit more “masculine” behaviour in order to have their voices heard?

Portia was specially written for the Women in the Arts Festival and first performed at Tristan Bates Theatre in December 2013.

Image credit: Claire Stringer www.clairestringer.com


Past Productions
  • The Red Baron
    Shaw's Women
    Oedipus Retold
    Making Dickie Happy